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Gulliver's Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World (with the original color illustrations by Arthur Rackham). In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, commonly known as GULLIVER'S TRAVELS (1726, amended 1735), is a prose satire by Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift, that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the "travellers' tales" literary subgenre. It is Swift's best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature. The book became popular as soon as it was published. John Gay wrote in a 1726 letter to Swift that "It is universally read, from the cabinet council to the nursery." Since then, it has never been out of print. (more on www.wisehouse-classics.com)

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 4602 KB
  • Print Length: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Wisehouse Classics; 1 edition (12 May 2016)
  • Sold by: ¬†Amazon Media EU S.√† r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01FLMWTAA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray: Not Enabled
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

Customer Reviews

A good read

One person found this helpful.
 on 19 July 2017
By Mrs. M. G. Sackville-hamilton
It is the first time I have read the full version of all his travels. I am still amazed that in the mid 17th century such a talented aurthor should be able to put into words so much material that is still relevant today. His imagination captures the reader from many aspects. In the later travels the variety of societies he encounters and the discussions put forward really just go to show that much is the same today..

A Classic for the Ages

One person found this helpful.
 on 21 August 2013
By dregj
Written almost like travel diary entries ,the style is quite functional and basic.

WOW

2 people found this helpful.
 on 17 June 2014
By Kev Johnson
Though we all think we know Gullivers travels, mainly from the Lilliput highlight, the remainder of Defoe’s (imaginary?) travels are absolutely fascinating. Social commentary at it’s best, irrespective of the age of the viewpoint. There are so many parallels with our world now, we should be ashamed of ourselves for our pomposity. This should be required reading for all children, teenagers & (especially) the movers & shakers in the political world.

Swift – a wit of Brobdingnagian proportions

 on 15 December 2010
By Mash
The work itself fully deserves five stars. Swift combines a jaunty and engrossing fantasy novel with biting satire and parody. Sure, some things may at first go over the modern reader’s head (the 1660 Act of Indemnity anyone…?) but much of the book’s description of human nature remains unsettlingly relevant. Whether approached as a storybook or as a piece of socio-political commentary, this is a rewarding read. Unfortunately, if you intend to delve into this latter aspect of the book this (Wordsworth Classics) edition lets it down. The notes, while adequate, are at the back, requiring you to constantly flick distractedly between pages. I was also disappointed by the introduction, which gives only a very brief account of the political context, no account of the book’s aftermath, and introduces a plethora of sophisticated readings while giving them only the most superficial explanation.

Not a children’s story

 on 16 July 2014
By CoffeeandCake
I’m not really sure why this is often thought to be a children’s book, I think it would have confused and (in parts) terrified me as a child. It was funny (a mix of satire and crude jokes), debate-provoking, and in an interesting style of mock travel guide. The narrator irritated me but there was enough other positives to make up for this.

Far Better Than I Remembered

 on 5 September 2013
By Reg Roberts
Recently, I’ve been tempted by the chaep (free?) and easy access to classic books on Kindle to re-read a number of those I read/studied at school and university. Gulliver’s Travels is the one that’s really stood out as better than I remembered from childhood (prose too difficult) and university (so much cross-checking of historical and political references). This time I’ve read purely for pleasure and it’s been a real treat. The only thing that’s sad is how little human behaviour, especially in politics and religion, has changed in 300 years – the satire is just as pertinent today as it was in Swift’s time.
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